Sunday, December 29, 2013

2013.12.29 The Lord of Misrule

Images of the Lord of Misrule: unruly, wild—lush with arch abandon, and deliciously out of bounds.








We Christians think of Lord as THE Lord, the one we call Jesus Christ. The ancient East thought of Lord as Emperor, the Caesar to be obeyed and worshiped. But have you ever thought of Lord as multiple? Well, of course not, but why not? The face of God in human form is embossed on all life—even fools. It’s the message of Christmas. It’s incarnation, you fool!

In medieval England the twelve days of Christmas were sovereigned by the Lord of Misrule, the pagan god of mischief and fun.  It was a time dedicated to merriment, a time for frolic and fun, to make friends not foes, to feast not fast—a time for smile not snark.  

In short, go wild.  Hurt no one. Love everyone—everything take into your heart for warmth and sweet home where all wild things dwell in peace. Which, after all, are the most prolific and the most alluring of flowers?  Those that grew on the side of the road, those that children are allowed to pick at will, just for fun to make their bouquets—because they are unimportantly wild.

Be wild, O my soul, for the source of Wonder;
let all your insides praise God’s Holy Name.
Be wild, O my soul, for the source of Wonder
who leads you into life.

            (paraphrase, Psalm 103, Greenberg translation)

For the curious: 1. The green smily-looking balls are ballistic bath bombs, slow fizzers that when immersed in your bath water fizzle and moisturize your skin while emitting a mysterious scent of vanilla and gardenia.   2. The couple dancing in inverted postures are losing their heads, reversing even bodily rectitude.   (I wonder if this is what a reaction to the good news of divine love all round might have been like?)